The Influence of Internal Migration on Exposure to Extreme Weather Events in Mexico

Type

Journal Article

Author(s)

Runfola, D. M.
Romero-Lankao, P.
Jiang, L.
Hunter, L. M.
Nawrotzki, R.
Sanchez, L.

Title

The Influence of Internal Migration on Exposure to Extreme Weather Events in Mexico

Year

2013

Journal

Working Paper – Population Program, Instituteof Behavioral Science, University of Colorado Boulder

Vol (No), pp

1-53

Abstract

Between 2005 and 2010, 6.3 million migrants (approximately 6% of the population) moved domestically within Mexico, predominantly to urban locations. These shifts – both in migratory streams and resulting population distribution– have potential implications for the exposure of populations to natural disasters. We ask: How have recent migratory patterns in Mexico influenced exposure to extreme weather events? To examine this question, we use census micro‐data in conjunction with recorded data on natural disaster events. The populations exposed to extreme weather events are first calculated based on observed disasters and demographic change between 2005 and 2010. This is compared to a hypothetical scenario with no migration between 2005 and 2010 to identify the contribution of migration to exposure both in the aggregate and for specific municipalities within Mexico. The results demonstrate that, while migration has decreased overall exposure within Mexico, this influence is highly localized in select municipalities – especially of Mexico City and Monterrey.

Citation

Runfola, D. M., Romero-Lankao, P., Jiang, L., Hunter, L. M., Nawrotzki, R., & Sanchez, L. (2013). The Influence of Internal Migration on Exposure to Extreme Weather Events in Mexico. Working Paper – Population Program, Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado Boulder, 1-53. URL : http://www.colorado.edu/ibs/pubs/pop/pop2013-0004.pdf

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